Tesla recalls nearly 130,000 vehicles due to overheating CPU issue. Software fix coming

Tesla has recalled 129,960 cars because of CPU issues that could cause the vehicle's touchscreen to lag or go blank.

In an announcement posted on May 3, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said the recall includes the 2022 Model 3, the 2021-2022 Model S, the 2021-2022 Model X and the 2022 Model Y.

According to the notice, the infotainment central processing unit (CPU) may overheat while fast-charging, causing the CPU to lag or restart.

When the CPU slows down or restarts, the center screen display that drivers rely on to see the rearview camera video, warning lights and transmission status (drive, neutral or reverse) could lag or go blank. If drivers can't see or control these features, there's an increased risk of a crash, the notice read.

The fix? Tesla plans to offer a free over-the-air software update to improve CPU temperature management.

According to documents on the NHTSA website, Tesla's firmware update will improve the management of the CPU temperature and other features with "elevated temperature operation."

Tesla owners impacted should get letters of notification in the mail sometime around or after July 1. They can also contact Tesla customer service at 1-877-798-3752 using recall number SB-22-00-009.

More recalls:USA TODAY's database of publicly available recall data

Vehicle recalls:Ford, Tesla, GM, Nissan, Toyota, others among vehicle recalls this week

The issue began around Dec. 23 during routine testing on the Model 3 and Model Y CPU, documents on the NHTSA website read. Technicians detected throttling from thermal protections being engaged and launched an investigation. On Jan. 3, a CPU from a 2021 Model S was replaced for an overheating condition that caused the center screen display to reboot when the vehicle was supercharging. Other CPUs had to be replaced that month as well for the same overheating issue.

As of May 2, Tesla found 59 warranty claims and 59 field reports received between Jan. 5 and May 2 that are or could be related to the overheating issue.

"Tesla is not aware of any crashes, injuries, or deaths related to this condition," the documents read.

Saleen Martin is a reporter on USA TODAY's NOW team. She is from Norfolk, Virginia and loves all things horror, witches, Christmas and food.

Saleen Martin, sdmartin@usatoday.com, Twitter: @Saleen_Martin