3 To Know: Missing leg of the Sanibel Lighthouse located; Blood pressure medicine recall

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The Sanibel Lighthouse on Friday Oct. 28, 2022. The iconic structure was damaged and the buildings at the base were washed away in Hurricane Ian.

1. Missing leg of the Sanibel Lighthouse located

The missing leg of the damaged Sanibel Lighthouse has been located. What are the next steps?

The missing leg of the iconic Sanibel Lighthouse was located this week, almost a month after Hurricane Ian ravaged the tiny island and historic landmark.

The leg was found broken in three pieces and laying in the sand by officials. It is alleged that when the storm surge swept through the area, it lifted the houses adjacent to the lighthouse, known as the keeper homes.

Combined with winds of more than 155 mph, the houses knocked into tower and the leg was ripped out.

The foundation to its ground-level stairs was also lost during the storm.

While officials believed the original leg could be reattached onto the 138-year-old structure, Celina Kersh, president of the Sanibel Historical Museum and Village, says that might no longer be a reality.  

“The structural engineer has just indicated to me that though we were initially thinking about (reattaching the leg), what I would call building Humpty Dumpty back together again, we will probably not be able to do that,” Kersh said. “We'll have to have a new leg cast out of the same material because the way the leg broke, the way the pieces broke … they don't think they're going to be structurally strong enough to reknit back together.” – Samantha Neely/Staff

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2. Man charged with four counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon in Naples

A man is facing charges after walking around a Naples car dealership carrying a rifle and wearing a camouflage tarp, according to the Naples Police Department. 

Micah Weiss Bennett was arrested on Friday, charged with four counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after police received a 911 call.

Police said Bennett approached several employees and customers while holding a rifle, which caused mass panic at the Jaguar Naples dealership on U.S. 41. Employees and customers ran from the dealership and said they believed their lives were in danger.

When officers arrived on the scene, they observed Bennett driving out of the dealership in his truck. They conducted a traffic stop. An inventory of Bennett’s vehicle yielded 14 handguns, 3 rifles, brass knuckles, a large amount of ammunition, and a bulletproof vest.

Bennett told officers he was being attacked by radiation and made other statements.

Detectives attempted to interview Bennett, but he indicated people were following him and declined to be interviewed further.

Bennett’s mother was contacted and advised them that her son was diagnosed as bipolar and was previously placed into protective custody under the state's Baker Act, according to police.

He traveled from Pierson, Florida to visit his aunt in Fort Myers but it’s unknown why he went to the car dealership. The investigation is ongoing. – Luis Zambrano/Staff

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3. Blood pressure medicine recall: Some pills pose potential cancer risk, FDA announces

A pharmaceutical company is recalling a blood pressure medication due to a potential cancer risk, the FDA announced this week.

Aurobindo Pharma USA is recalling two lots of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide tablets due to levels of nitrosamine. The tablets are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypertension to lower blood pressure.

Aurobindo Pharma USA is recalling two lots of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide tablets due to unacceptable levels of nitrosamine. The tablets are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypertension.

Low levels of nitrosamine, or N-nitroso-quinapril, is regularly found in water and food including cured and grilled meats, dairy products and vegetables. Exposure to high levels, the FDA reports, has been linked with an elevated risk of cancer.

According to the FDA advisory, the medication are “pink colored, scored, round shaped, biconvex, film-coated tablets, debossed with ‘D’ on the scored side and ‘19’ on the other side.”

“Patients should contact their doctor or health care provider about whether to continue taking their medication, or whether to consider an alternative treatment prior to returning their medication,” according to an advisory on the FDA’s website.

Consumers with questions about the recall can call 1-866-850-2876 or email pvg@aurobindousa.com. – Natalie Neysa Alund/USA Today