Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan revealed as one lawmaker who sent text messages to Mark Meadows

Amy Nakamura
USA TODAY

Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan is among the lawmakers who texted with Mark Meadows, chief of staff to former President Donald Trump.

Jordan forwarded a text message to Meadows, regarding a legal theory that then-Vice President Mike Pence could prevent the certification of Electoral College votes from the 2020 election, according to CNN.

The text messagewas revealed this week by the House committee investigating Jan. 6.  

The message Jordan forwarded originally came from former Pentagon Inspector General Joseph Schmitz, according to reports from CNN, Politico and NBC. Jordan spokesman Russell Dye confirmed the text's authenticity to CNN.

More:What's next for Mark Meadows? Ex-Trump chief of staff faces Justice decision on contempt

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., read part of the text message aloud Monday before the committee voted to hold Meadows in contempt for defying a subpoena.

Schiff highlighted a portion of the text message: “On January 6, 2021, Vice President Mike Pence, as President of the Senate, should call out all the electoral votes that he believes are unconstitutional as no electoral votes at all."

“You can see why this is so critical to ask Mr. Meadows about, about a lawmaker suggesting that the former vice president simply throw out votes that he unilaterally deems unconstitutional, in order to overturn a presidential election and subvert the will of the American people,” Schiff said during his presentation to the committee.

The full text message, forwarded by Meadows reads: “On January 6, 2021, Vice President Mike Pence, as President of the Senate, should call out all the electoral votes that he believes are unconstitutional as no electoral votes at all — in accordance with guidance from founding father Alexander Hamilton and judicial precedence. ‘No legislative act,’ wrote Alexander Hamilton in Federalist No. 78, ‘contrary to the Constitution, can be valid.’ The court in Hubbard v. Lowe reinforced this truth: ‘That an unconstitutional statute is not a law at all is a proposition no longer open to discussion.’ 226 F. 135, 137 (SDNY 1915), appeal dismissed, 242 U.S. 654 (1916).”

The text message wasone of the 9,000 documents that Meadows turned into the committee before denying testifying.

On Tuesday night, the House voted to hold Meadows in contempt. The House also urged the Department of Justice to prosecute the former chief of staff criminally for contempt.

Meadows' attorney said the decision to defy the committee’s subpoena is based on Trump’s claim of executive privilege to keep their conversations confidential.

Meadows is the second top Trump aide to face charges, with the initial charge against  former top adviser Steve Bannon.